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A World of Nets | PHA on Media Trust-Busting

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Source: Conversa Afiada.

Brazilian TV reporter and political humorist Paulo Henrique Amorim argues that Brazil is swimming against the tide in the area of economic regulation of the media in Latin America, with the passage and implementation of Mexico’s Ley de los Médios, which goes into effect in March 2015. Headline:

Globo is not just “dominant” — it is a monopoly!

México, as we learn from Vargas Llosa, is the perfect dictatorship.

México is also the darling of the (American) risk agencies, and as a result, of the Brazilian neoliberals as well, such as Bacha.

México has recently elected a president from the PRI, Peña Nieto, a young man with the air of a São Paulo Toucan*, and as a result reflecting all that is most conservative and defeatist in Latin America.

* Toucan: member of the Social Democratic party

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Mexico Stands Up to Its Globo | Conversa Afiada

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I am not a big fan of the noisy Conversa Afiada –brainchild of TV Record reporter PHA — but I thank it for tipping me off to an important story from Mexico, as reported by the indomitable Carmen Aristegui, ex-CNN Español.

Regulatory agencies are attempting to rein in Televisa and its 75% lock on the Mexican broadcast media market.

Let me present an excerpt from the more technical treatment of the historic trust-busting, rule-changing decrees and resolutions, followed by an analysis by PHA, among whose virtues is an understanding of the parallels between Brazilian Globo and Mexican Televisa — both of them attempted stealers of elections — and of the activities of the Mexican magnate Carlos Slim in Brazil.

Televisa is a “dominant economic agent,” rules Ifetel

“The resolution announced yesterday by the Federal Institue of Telecommunications (IFT) imposes various and significant measures, conditions and restrictions on the broadcasting business of the Televisa Group,” the company recognizes.

IFTel declared Televisa a dominant economic agent in the broadcasting market and will subject it to a series of regulatory measures.

The empire of Emilio Azcárraga Jean will be obliged to share infrastructure, turn over to IFTel the terms and conditions of its advertising broadcasts and will not be allowed to acquire exclusive transmission rights in Mexico.

The company acknowledged that “all of these resolutions and actions of the IFT affect the Televisa Group in many areas related to its broadcasting and pay TV businesses, and we will evaluate the scope and impact in a case by case manner, in terms of its operating results, activities and businesses.

And the company warned: “As a result of the size of the declaration of dominance, with its 650 pages and of the complexity of these resolutions and proclamations, we will closely analyze any measure (of a legal, commercial or other nature) that Televisa must take in implementing them.”

Categorizing Televisa as a dominant economic actor in the telecommunications sector imposes the following conditions on its businesses:

Sharing of Infrastructure: Grupo Televisa will be required to place its broadcasting infrastructure at the disposition of third parties in a non-discriminatory, non-exclusive manner, with the exception of broadcasters broadcasters that have 12 MHz or more of broadcast spectrum in the affected region. This infrastructure includes, among other things, non-electronic components of the transmitters, right of way, towers, masts, energy sources and air conditioning systems. This measure aims to expedite the entry of new broadcasters into the market.

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