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São Paulo | Autobots and Current Affairs

FNOP8121

Source: EXAME (Editora  Abril)

São Paulo – Though Minister of Mines and Energy Eduardo Braga and the chief executive of the ONS, Hermes Chipp, have denied that the blackout of January 19 was related to an endemic energy shortage, there are other explanations for the incident.

A government technician, who said he could not identify himself, explained to the daily O Estado de S. Paulo that the origin of the problem was elevated consumption in the state of São Paulo, which exceeded all expectations for the day.

The explosion of demand (consumption plus waste) in the state began after lunch, at approximately 2:00 p.m., With consumption outpacing generation, the (line) frequency — in the U.K., the “mains frequency” — fell to 60 Hz and certain generator plants automatically went offline.

This is a point I do not understand. What has it to do with the utility frequency on the transmission lines? Wikipedia reports:

Initially in Brazil, electric machinery were imported from Europe and United States, implying the country had both 50 Hz and 60 Hz standards according to each region. In 1938, the federal government made a law, Decreto-Lei 852, intended to bring the whole country under 50 Hz with an eight-year deadline. The law didn’t work, and in the early 1960s it was decided that Brazil would be unified under 60 Hz standard, because most developed areas used 60 Hz; so a new law Lei 4.454 was declared in 1964. Brazil underwent a frequency conversion program to 60 Hz that was not completed until 1978

The Brazilian wall socket remains something of a mystery to me, I can say.

Continuing with the explication of Monday’s incident:

With that, it was necessary to activate the so-called [“capacity relief control,”] which shuts plants down when loads predefined by the distributors are reached, the technician says. “It was unexpected.” According to reports from ONS, the estimated load of the Southeast and Central-West on Monday was an average of 43.850 megawatts (MW). But the actual load was 44.853 MW on average — more than 1,000 MW above the expected level. In the Northeast, which also posted record consumption, this difference was a mere 7 MW on average.

The source says that last week, the system had been tested by another period of record consumption, but the ONS was able to sustain the load. From January 12 to January 17, however, the maximum difference between the planned load and what was observed in the Southeast and Central-West was 528 MW.

Wind Power to the Rescue

A welcome surprise this Monday, helping to prevent a worse situation, were the wind-farms, especially those in the Northeast. At 2:48 p.m., the aeolic parks were producing 2,057 MW. In compensation, the thermoelectric plants produced 774 MW less than expected, due to a shortage of fuel, lesser income from the generator units, and maintenance. If this year’s heat waves and rains follow the trend observed in 2014, Brazil may have to face some challenges this year. In 2014, peak demand occurred in February, the ONS executive said. The information is from the O Estado de S. Paulo.

Electricity_Grid_Schematic_EnglishElectricity_Grid_Schematic_English

FNOP8121

Source: EXAME (Editora  Abril)

São Paulo – Though Minister of Mines and Energy Eduardo Braga and the chief executive of the ONS, Hermes Chipp, have denied that the blackout of January 19 was related to an endemic energy shortage, there are other explanations for the incident.

A government technician, who said he could not identify himself, explained to the daily O Estado de S. Paulo that the origin of the problem was elevated consumption in the state of São Paulo, which exceeded all expectations for the day.

The explosion of demand (consumption plus waste) in the state began after lunch, at approximately 2:00 p.m., With consumption outpacing generation, the (line) frequency — in the U.K., the “mains frequency” — fell to 60 Hz and certain generator plants automatically went offline.

This is a point I do not understand. What has it to do with the utility frequency on the transmission lines? Wikipedia reports:

Initially in Brazil, electric machinery were imported from Europe and United States, implying the country had both 50 Hz and 60 Hz standards according to each region. In 1938, the federal government made a law, Decreto-Lei 852, intended to bring the whole country under 50 Hz with an eight-year deadline. The law didn’t work, and in the early 1960s it was decided that Brazil would be unified under 60 Hz standard, because most developed areas used 60 Hz; so a new law Lei 4.454 was declared in 1964. Brazil underwent a frequency conversion program to 60 Hz that was not completed until 1978

The Brazilian wall socket remains something of a mystery to me, I can say.

Continuing with the explication of Monday’s incident:

With that, it was necessary to activate the so-called [“capacity relief control,”] which shuts plants down when loads predefined by the distributors are reached, the technician says. “It was unexpected.” According to reports from ONS, the estimated load of the Southeast and Central-West on Monday was an average of 43.850 megawatts (MW). But the actual load was 44.853 MW on average — more than 1,000 MW above the expected level. In the Northeast, which also posted record consumption, this difference was a mere 7 MW on average.

The source says that last week, the system had been tested by another period of record consumption, but the ONS was able to sustain the load. From January 12 to January 17, however, the maximum difference between the planned load and what was observed in the Southeast and Central-West was 528 MW.

Wind Power to the Rescue

A welcome surprise this Monday, helping to prevent a worse situation, were the wind-farms, especially those in the Northeast. At 2:48 p.m., the aeolic parks were producing 2,057 MW. In compensation, the thermoelectric plants produced 774 MW less than expected, due to a shortage of fuel, lesser income from the generator units, and maintenance. If this year’s heat waves and rains follow the trend observed in 2014, Brazil may have to face some challenges this year. In 2014, peak demand occurred in February, the ONS executive said. The information is from the O Estado de S. Paulo.

Electricity_Grid_Schematic_EnglishElectricity_Grid_Schematic_English

Reuters indulges in apocalyptic coverage of the two-hour event.

Jan 19 (Reuters) – Rolling blackouts swept across parts of Brazil on Monday as the grid operator ordered select power cuts to avoid a larger crisis, drawing attention to a fragile electric system that is buckling under the strains of record-breaking heat and dryness. Grid operator ONS said it orchestrated 2,200 megawatts of controlled outages in eight states as the hottest day of the year in Sao Paulo, where the temperature hit 36.5 Celsius (97.7 Fahrenheit), and other southeastern cities led to surging demand from air conditioners and other power-hungry appliances. Eletronuclear, a unit of state-run power company Eletrobras , said nuclear reactor Angra I powered down automatically at 2:49 p.m. local time (1649 GMT) due to a drop in frequency on the national grid. The company said there were no risks to workers or the environment due to the stoppage.

Nuclear power is an infinitesimal input to the system.

Brazilian officials have repeatedly denied the need for energy rationing, even as the driest spell in more than 80 years drains hydropower reserves and forces the use of more costly thermal plants. The drought has also raised the specter of water rationing in Sao Paulo, Brazil’s business hub and South America’s largest metropolitan area. [Reuters]

… the country had both 50 Hz and 60 Hz standards according to each region. In 1938, the federal government made a law, Decreto-Lei 852, intended to bring the whole country under 50 Hz with an eight-year deadline. The law didn’t work, and in the early 1960s it was decided that Brazil would be unified under 60 Hz standard, because most developed areas used 60 Hz; so a new law Lei 4.454 was declared in 1964. Brazil underwent a frequency conversion program to 60 Hz that was not completed until 1978. [Wikipedia]

With that, it was necessary to activate the so-called “capacity relief control,” which shuts plants down at loads predefined by the distributors, the technician says. “It was unexpected.” According to reports from ONS, the estimated load of the Southeast and Central-West on Monday was an average of 43.850 megawatts (MW). But the actual load was 44.853 MW on average — more than 1,000 MW above the expected level. In the Northeast, which also posted record consumption, this difference was a mere 7 MW on average. The source says that last week, the system had been tested by another period of record consumption, but the ONS was able to maintain the load. From January 12 to January 17, however, the maximum difference between the planned load and what was observed in the Southeast and Central-West was 528 MW.

Wind Power to the Rescue

A welcome surprise this Monday, helping to prevent a worse situation, were the wind-farms, especially those of the Northeast. At 2:48 p.m., the aeolic parks were producing 2,057 MW. In compensation, the thermoelectric plants produced 774 MW less than expected, due to a shortage of fuel, lesser income from the generator units, and maintenance.

If this year’s heat waves and rains follow the trend observed in 2014, Brazil may have to face some challenges this year. In 2014, peak demand occurred in February, the ONS executive said. The information is from the O Estado de S. Paulo.

Reuters uses apocalyptic language to describe the disruption, including that hackneyed bit of marxian melodrama, “the specter of …” x, y or z.

Jan 19 (Reuters) – Rolling blackouts swept across paAutrts of Brazil on Monday as the grid operator ordered select power cuts to avoid a larger crisis, drawing attention to a fragile electric system that is buckling under the strains of record-breaking heat and dryness. Grid operator ONS said it orchestrated 2,200 megawatts of controlled outages in eight states as the hottest day of the year in Sao Paulo, where the temperature hit 36.5 Celsius (97.7 Fahrenheit), and other southeastern cities led to surging demand from air conditioners and other power-hungry appliances. Eletronuclear, a unit of state-run power company Eletrobras , said nuclear reactor Angra I powered down automatically at 2:49 p.m. local time (1649 GMT) due to a drop in frequency on the national grid. The company said there were no risks to workers or the environment due to the stoppage. Brazilian officials have repeatedly denied the need for energy rationing, even as the driest spell in more than 80 years drains hydropower reserves and forces the use of more costly thermal plants. The drought has also raised the specter of water rationing in Sao Paulo, Brazil’s business hub and South America’s largest metropolitan area.

Reuters indulges in apocalyptic coverage of the two-hour event.

Jan 19 (Reuters) – Rolling blackouts swept across parts of Brazil on Monday as the grid operator ordered select power cuts to avoid a larger crisis, drawing attention to a fragile electric system that is buckling under the strains of record-breaking heat and dryness. Grid operator ONS said it orchestrated 2,200 megawatts of controlled outages in eight states as the hottest day of the year in Sao Paulo, where the temperature hit 36.5 Celsius (97.7 Fahrenheit), and other southeastern cities led to surging demand from air conditioners and other power-hungry appliances. Eletronuclear, a unit of state-run power company Eletrobras , said nuclear reactor Angra I powered down automatically at 2:49 p.m. local time (1649 GMT) due to a drop in frequency on the national grid. The company said there were no risks to workers or the environment due to the stoppage.

Nuclear power is an infinitesimal input to the system.

Brazilian officials have repeatedly denied the need for energy rationing, even as the driest spell in more than 80 years drains hydropower reserves and forces the use of more costly thermal plants. The drought has also raised the specter of water rationing in Sao Paulo, Brazil’s business hub and South America’s largest metropolitan area. [Reuters]

… the country had both 50 Hz and 60 Hz standards according to each region. In 1938, the federal government made a law, Decreto-Lei 852, intended to bring the whole country under 50 Hz with an eight-year deadline. The law didn’t work, and in the early 1960s it was decided that Brazil would be unified under 60 Hz standard, because most developed areas used 60 Hz; so a new law Lei 4.454 was declared in 1964. Brazil underwent a frequency conversion program to 60 Hz that was not completed until 1978. [Wikipedia]

With that, it was necessary to activate the so-called “capacity relief control,” which shuts plants down at loads predefined by the distributors, the technician says. “It was unexpected.” According to reports from ONS, the estimated load of the Southeast and Central-West on Monday was an average of 43.850 megawatts (MW). But the actual load was 44.853 MW on average — more than 1,000 MW above the expected level. In the Northeast, which also posted record consumption, this difference was a mere 7 MW on average. The source says that last week, the system had been tested by another period of record consumption, but the ONS was able to maintain the load. From January 12 to January 17, however, the maximum difference between the planned load and what was observed in the Southeast and Central-West was 528 MW.

Wind Power to the Rescue

A welcome surprise this Monday, helping to prevent a worse situation, were the wind-farms, especially those of the Northeast. At 2:48 p.m., the aeolic parks were producing 2,057 MW. In compensation, the thermoelectric plants produced 774 MW less than expected, due to a shortage of fuel, lesser income from the generator units, and maintenance.

If this year’s heat waves and rains follow the trend observed in 2014, Brazil may have to face some challenges this year. In 2014, peak demand occurred in February, the ONS executive said. The information is from the O Estado de S. Paulo.

Reuters uses apocalyptic language to describe the disruption, including that hackneyed bit of marxian melodrama, “the specter of …” x, y or z.

Jan 19 (Reuters) – Rolling blackouts swept across paAutrts of Brazil on Monday as the grid operator ordered select power cuts to avoid a larger crisis, drawing attention to a fragile electric system that is buckling under the strains of record-breaking heat and dryness. Grid operator ONS said it orchestrated 2,200 megawatts of controlled outages in eight states as the hottest day of the year in Sao Paulo, where the temperature hit 36.5 Celsius (97.7 Fahrenheit), and other southeastern cities led to surging demand from air conditioners and other power-hungry appliances. Eletronuclear, a unit of state-run power company Eletrobras , said nuclear reactor Angra I powered down automatically at 2:49 p.m. local time (1649 GMT) due to a drop in frequency on the national grid. The company said there were no risks to workers or the environment due to the stoppage. Brazilian officials have repeatedly denied the need for energy rationing, even as the driest spell in more than 80 years drains hydropower reserves and forces the use of more costly thermal plants. The drought has also raised the specter of water rationing in Sao Paulo, Brazil’s business hub and South America’s largest metropolitan area.