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Coerced or Coopted | Car Wash Judge is Globo Personality of the Year

Be guided b the tenets of M(a)rinh(o) Thought

Be guided b the tenets of M(a)rinh(o) Thought

A follow-up to

A young, publicity-shy judge, who aspires to the standard set by Italy’s Mani Puliti case, develops a public relations strategy using a Globo competitor as his discrete back channel.

The media establishment looks to canonize Moro, as Luis Nassif takes note, and I translate an excerpt.

Judge Sérgio Moro was elected “Personality of the Year” for 2014 by the daily O Globo.

Awarding him such an eloquent homage was a jury that seemed not to be representative of anything except the Globo group. It didn’t exactly reflect public opinion; it didn’t reflect the opinion of Rio de Janeiro. Perhaps the choice was met with approval by the residents of Leblon, but these were not consulted.

The distinguished award, announced in all the media outlets, was presented by a diversified jury consisting of Aluizio Maranhão, an O Globo journalist, Ancelmo Gois, an O Globo columnist, Ascânio Seleme, an O Globo editor, Merval Pereira, a Globo columnist, Mirian Leitão, an O Globo columnist, and Eduardo Eugênio Gouvêa Vieira, a brother-in-law of Merval, if I am not mistaken, and an O Globo columnist.

Awarding Moro such an elegant homage was a jury that seemed not to be representative of anything except the Globo group. It did not exactly reflect public opinion; it didn’t reflect the opinion of Rio de Janeiro. Perhaps the choice was met with approval by the residents of Leblon, but these were not consulted.

So there was, in fact, a certain lack of diversity in the jury selection. They could have presented a little more balance by including a columnist from the O Globo Varieties section, a special reporter, or who knows, an editorial writer related by marriage to Seleme. Not that this would have much effect on the final result, which was a jury representative of the Brothers Marinho.

(Ma)rinh(o) Thought triumphant!

The award is an excellent example of the other side of character assassination: Those who refuse to give in to fear are moved by vanity.

Judge Sérgio Moro is a judge of the same nature as Fausto De Sanctis, who oversaw the Satiagraha case.

De Sanctis faced more powerful resistance because of the enormous financial power and methods of the banker Daniel Dantas, who exercised unlimited power over the media, and because of the shameless exercise of power by Supreme Court justice Gilmar Mendes, a judge who involves himself in all aspects of the constitutional order and has a reputation for abritrary rulings.

[De  Sanctis] was vilified and assigned the role of villain because he attacked the wrong plutocrat, whose hobby is financing journalism and environmental Web sites, managing the foreign investments of Rio high society and allying himself with the economists of the [Plano] Real.

Moro is faced with a powerful organization as well, it is true, but in his case the media supports all of his actions, in partnership with prosecutors and police agents who engage in highly selective leaking.

Trying the case in the press in return for peace and quiet?

He has become a media hero because he chose the correct plutocrat. Or no, not the right plutocrat, exactly, but the desired political target.

The 2013 Personality of the Year was former STF chief justice Joaquim Barbosa, rapporteur of the AP 470, the «mensalão» or «payola of the PT». Joaquim, however,  “the little boy who saved Brazil,”* was individualistic enough to avoid getting involved in such intrigues: his lack of balanced judgement comes naturally, with no need for external motivations.

Things went easier with  Ayres Britto, It was enough to spare him from accusations, invite him to write book blurbs, praise his poetry … and then hire him to lead Innovare, a quality assurance prize used by the Globo Organizations to captivate the judicial branch.

The strategy of flattery alternating with assault and battery has a deadly effect on the judicial branch, affecting all magistrates in all respects.

What is more, the manner in which more critically minded judges explain to those surprised at their rulings is to recall that “we are all human” — some of us all too human, we would add.

The attack on STF justice Ricardo Lewandowski exposed him to public humiliation. The tactic of flattery inebriated even the austere Celso de Mello, who let fly many memorable broadsides during the trial of AP 470.

It is interesting how the media frenzy creates distortions in the perceptions of the praised (or attacked) judged themselves. In the first phase of AP 470, STF dean Celso de Mello behaved like a dazed, confused law student, while Lewandowski experienced deep humiliation.

At the end of the trial, both justices returned to their former status, with Lewandowski deemed an exemplary judge who did not give in to the ranting of the mob. It was  only then that it because clear that it was Celso de Mello who pointed out the enormous gap between the opinion of the media and the opinion of the Court.

He returned to his unpretentious, cautious ways, reasserting the value of sobriety, and courageously faced up to the heavy-duty barrage he suffered in the pages of O Globo and Veja.

Let us be clear, then, about the use of attacks and the use of flattery. Both serve the interests of a powerful group — the media — which is far from virtuous, tending to pursue its own interests, which it very often places above the public interest.dazzled

It poses as a moralist when it comes time to attack its adversaries, but sanctifies the impious when its own interests are at stake — as was the case in the beatification of Senator Demóstenes Torres,* and now, this incredible Eduardo Cunha.*

Let us hope Sérgio Moro is not taken hostage by this shameless campaign to appeal to his vanity. lutocrat, exactly, but the desired political target.

The 2013 Personality of the Year was former STF chief justice Joaquim Barbosa, rapporteur of the AP 470, the «mensalão» or «payola of the PT». Joaquim, however,  “the little boy who saved Brazil,”* was individualistic enough to avoid getting involved in such intrigues: his lack of balanced judgement comes naturally, with no need for external motivations.

Things went easier with  Ayres Britto, It was enough to spare him from accusations, invite him to write book blurbs, praise his poetry … and then hire him to lead Innovare, a quality assurance prize used by the Globo Organizations to captivate the judicial branch.

The strategy of flattery alternating with assault and battery has a deadly effect on the judicial branch, affecting all magistrates in all respects.

What is more, the manner in which more critically minded judges attentuate the impulses of those surprised at their rulings is to recall that “we are all human” — some of us all too human, we would add.

The attack on STF justice Ricardo Lewandowski exposed him to public humiliation. The tactic of flattery inebriated even the austere Celso de Mello, who let fly many memorable broadsides during the trial of AP 470.

It is interesting how the media frenzy creates distortions in the perceptions of the ingratiated (or attacked) themselves. In the first phase of AP 470, STF dean Celso de Mello behaved like a dazzled law student, while Lewandowski experienced deep humiliation.

At the end of the trial, both justices returned to their former status, with Lewandowski deemed an exemplary judge who did not give in to the ranting of the mob. It was  only then that it because clear that it was Celso de Mello who pointed out the enormous gap between the opinion of the media and the opinion of the Court.

He returned to his unpretentious, cautious ways, reasserting the value of sobriety, and courageously faced up to the heavy-duty barrage he suffered in the pages of O Globo and Veja.

Let us be clear, then, about the use of attacks and the use of flattery. Both serve the interests of a powerful group — the media — which is far from virtuous, tending to its own interests which it often places above the public interest. It poses as a moralist when it comes time to attack its adversaries, but sanctifies the impious when its interests are at stake — as was the case in the beatification of Senator Demóstenes Torres,* and now, this incredible Eduardo Cunha.*

Let us hope Sérgio Moro is not taken hostage by this shameless campaign to appeal to his vanity. O Globo columnist, Mirian Leitão, an O Globo columnist, and Eduardo Eugênio Gouvêa Vieira, a brother-in-law of Merval, if I am not mistaken, a Globo columnist.

So there was, in fact, a certain lack of representativeness in the jury selection. They could have presented a little more balance by including a columnist from the O Globo Varieties section, a special reporter, or who knows, an editorial writer related by marriage to Seleme. Not that this would have much effect on the final result, which was a jury representative of the Brothers Marinho.

The award is a good example of the other side of character assassination: Those who refused to give in to fear are moved by vanity.

Judge Sérgio Moro is a judge of the same nature as Fausto De Sanctis, who oversaw the Satiagraha case.

De Sanctis faced more powerful resistance because of the enormous financial power and methods of the banker Daniel Dantas, who exercised unlimited power over the media, and because of the shameless exercise of power by Supreme Court justice Gilmar Mendes, a judge who involves himself in all aspects of the constitutional order and has a reputation for abritrary rulings.

[…] was vilified and assigned the role of villain because he attacked the wrong plutocrat, whose hobby is financing journalism and environmental Web sites, managing the foreign investments of Rio high society and allying himself with the economists of the [Plano] Real.

Moro is faced with a powerful organization as well, it is true, but in his case the media supports all of his actions, in partnership with prosecutors and police agents who engage in highly selective leaking.

He has become a hero because he chose the correct plutocrat. Or no, not the right plutocrat, exactly, but the desired political target.

The Little Black Boy Who Saved Brazil

Last year’s Personality of the Year was former STF chief justice Joaquim Barbosa, rapporteur of the AP 470, the «mensalão» or «payola of the PT». Joaquim, however,  “the little boy who saved Brazil,”* was individualistic enough to avoid getting involved in such intrigues: his lack of balanced judgement comes naturally, with no need for external motivations.

Things went easier with  Ayres Britto, It was enough to spare him from accusations, invite him to write book blurbs, praise his poetry … and then hire him to lead Innovare, a quality assurance prize used by the Globo Organizations to capture the judicial branch.

The strategy of flattery alternating with assault and battery has a deadly effect on the judicial branch, affecting all magistrates in all respects.

What is more, the manner in which more critically minded judges attenuate the impulses of those surprised at their rulings is to recall that “we are all human” — some of us all too human, we would add.

The attack on STF justice Ricardo Lewandowski exposed him to public humiliation. The tactic of flattery inebriated even the austere Celso de Mello, who let fly many memorable broadsides during the trial of AP 470.

It is interesting how the media frenzy creates distortions in the perceptions of the ingratiated (or attacked) themselves. In the first phase of AP 470, STF dean Celso de Mello behaved like a dazzled law student, while Lewandowski experienced deep humiliation.

At the end of the trial, both justices returned to their former status, with Lewandowski deemed an exemplary judge who did not give in to the ranting of the mob. It was only then that it because clear that it was Celso de Mello who pointed out the enormous gap between the opinion of the media and the opinion of the Court.

He returned to his unpretentious, cautious ways, reasserting the value of sobriety, and courageously faced up to the heavy-duty barrage he suffered in the pages of O Globo and Veja.

Let us be clear, then, about the use of attacks and the use of flattery. Both serve the interests of a powerful group — the media — which is far from virtuous, tending to its own interests which it often places above the public interest. It poses as a moralist when it comes time to attack its adversaries, but sanctifies the impious when its interests are at stake — as was the case in the beatification of Senator Demóstenes Torres,* and now, this incredible Eduardo Cunha.*

Let us hope Sérgio Moro is not taken hostage by this shameless campaign to appeal to his vanity.