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Revolving Spigots | Sambodian Water Rationing in April

Cisterna_Já

Source: O POVO

Topic: Improvising as water crisis looms

São Paulo residents are already preparing to confront a “drastic rotation” [of water pressure] as Paulo Massato, metropolitan director of Sabesp, described it last week. Under this regime, residents will go five consecutive days without pressure and only two with the pressure on.

Though the model for the rotation has not yet been defined, many local residents are buying [various types of rainwater capture and storage systems].The state government foresees the beginning of April as a start date for the rotation scheme, after the rainy seasons cease and the dead volume of the Cantareira System, which is operating at 5.1% of its capacity and supplies 6.2 million persons — the worst in the history of the metro area — is reached.

University professor Claudio Couto, a resident of Vila São Francisco in the western zone of the city, the rotation system is already operating. He and his family have gone without water for four days.

“We have two 1,000 liter reservoirs and I am going to install a third. This is the best I can do,” Couto says. He says that for the time being, his reserves are sufficient for basic needs. “We are economizing a lot and my sons are taking their baths at the club,” he said.

One of the measures taken by Sabesp to save water is the reduction in water pressure in the pipes, which in practice means that many citizens have no water supply for several hours a day.

On Monday, when students were returning to school, two state schools in the northern zone of the city sent their students home due to the lack of water.

The drought has also been a windfall for mineral water companies. In some supermarkets five-liter bottles are sold out, leaving only smaller amounts for sale.

For this reason, Couto decided to maintain a small stock of mineral water at home. “I always use a clay filter, but the taste changed as soon as they starting using the dead volume,” he said.

The need to economize motivated city residents to found a movement called “Cisterns Now.” The group gives free lectures and tutorials and builds small handmade cisterns, which capture and store rainwater.

“We want to do our shore and not just wait for the governments. We knew that a lot of time had been lost on political quibbling, and that there was little they could do,” explains Ariel Kogan, 29, one of the creators of the project.

The group built their first cistern at Ariel’s home. “I am using it to clean the floor, water the plants and, in the near future, for flushing out toilets.

We are doing that.

I also want to buy a chemical filter, so I can wash clothes with this water,” the engineer and business owner says.

Ariel says his two  200 liter cisterns cost around R$ 250 and are delivered immediately. He advises adding chlorine to the water and a cover over the reservoir, to avoid the proliferation of mosquitos and other other microorganisms [sic]

This is dengue season, and promises to be a particularly dangerous one. Why am I not reading about it in the news? Last year the news media milked the dengue scare for all it was worth.

Environmental specialist  Cláudio Bicudo, who helped to build rainwater capture systems, says that demand for his product has doubled already in January 2015. “Before the water crisis, there was no market for its. Now I am installing in homes and condominium,” he said.

The recent scarcity is a major concern of São Paulo merchants. Sérgio Santos, owner of the St. Etienne bakery in the Vila Madalena, decided to install three new reservoirs with a combined capacity of 15,000 liter. It cost me nearly R$20,000. The reservoirs have not been delivered yet, they are failing to show up at a lot of shops,” he complains.

Beauty salons are also losing big with the water shortage. To reduce costs, hairdressers are opting to spritz with water instead of the traditional hair wash.

Alexandre Tiso, who owns a salon in Perdizes, says he has been without water between 1:00 p.m. and the following morning.  “We cannot wash hair until midday. After that, it is a bucket … ” he says.

Source: O POVO

Topic: Improvising as water crisis looms

São Paulo residents are already preparing to confront a “drastic rotation,” as Paulo Massato, metropolitan director of Sabesp, described it last week. Under this regime, residents will go five consecutive days without pressure and only two with the pressure on.

Though the model for the rotation has not yet been defined, many local residents are buying [various types of rainwater capture and storage systems].The state government foresees the beginning of April as a start date for the rotation scheme, after the rainy seasons cease and the dead volume of the Cantareira System, which is operating at 5.1% of its capacity and supplies 6.2 million persons — the worst in the history of the metro area — is reached.

University professor Claudio Couto, a resident of Vila São Francisco in the western zone of the city, the rotation system is already operating. He and his family have gone without water for four days.

“We have two 1,000 liter reservoirs and I am going to install a third. This is the best I can do,” Couto says. He says that for the time being, his reserves are sufficient for basic needs. “We are economizing a lot and my sons are taking their baths at the club,” he said.

One of the measures taken by Sabesp to save water is the reduction in water pressure in the pipes, which in practice means that many citizens have no water supply for several hours a day.

On Monday, when students were returning to school, two state schools in the northern zone of the city sent their students home due to the lack of water.

The drought has also been a windfall for mineral water companies. In some supermarkets five-liter bottles are sold out, leaving only smaller amounts for sale.

For this reason, Couto decided to maintain a small stock of mineral water at home. “I always use a clay filter, but the taste changed as soon as they starting using the dead volume,” he said.

The need to economize motivated city residents to found a movement called “Cisterns Now.” The group gives free lectures and tutorials and builds small handmade cisterns, which capture and store rainwater.

“We want to do our shore and not just wait for the governments. We knew that a lot of time had been lost on political quibbling, and that there was little they could do,” explains Ariel Kogan, 29, one of the creators of the project.

The group built their first cistern at Ariel’s home. “I am using it to clean the floor, water the plants and, in the near future, for flushing out toilets.

We are doing that.

I also want to buy a chemical filter, so I can wash clothes with this water,” the engineer and business owner says.

Ariel says his two  200 liter cisterns cost around R$ 250 and are delivered immediately. He advises adding chlorine to the water and a cover over the reservoir, to avoid the proliferation of mosquitos and other other microorganisms [sic]

This is dengue season, and promises to be a particularly dangerous one. Why am I not reading about it in the news? Last year the news media milked the dengue scare for all it was worth.

Environmental specialist  Cláudio Bicudo, who helped to build rainwater capture systems, says that demand for his product has doubled already in January 2015. “Before the water crisis, there was no market for its. Now I am installing in homes and condominium,” he said.

The recent scarcity is a major concern of São Paulo merchants. Sérgio Santos, owner of the St. Etienne bakery in the Vila Madalena, decided to install three new reservoirs with a combined capacity of 15,000 liter. It cost me nearly R$20,000. The reservoirs have not been delivered yet, they are failing to show up at a lot of shops,” he complains.

Beauty salons are also losing big with the water shortage. To reduce costs, hairdressers are opting to spritz with water instead of the traditional hair wash.

Alexandre Tiso, who owns a salon in Perdizes, says he has been without water between 1:00 p.m. and the following morning.  “We cannot wash hair until midday. After that, it is a bucket … ” he says.