• February 2015
    M T W T F S S
    « Jan   Mar »
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    232425262728  
  • Pages

  • Marginalia

  • Accumulations

Observatório da Imprensa | Financing the Folia

Vintage roleta, with numbers and bichos

Vintage roleta, with numbers and bichos

Author:  Corruption Unmasked by Sergio da Motta e Albuquerque (February 10, 2015).

In 2007, the Diário de Notícias of Portugal published an article on the death threats communicated by the leading figure in the bingo rackets at the time, Anízio Abrahão David, to the parade judges, who were instructed to vote for the carnival society he patronizes, Beija-Flor (Hummingbird) of Nilópolis. The Hummingbird was victorious.

The tradition continues, according to da Motta:

Major figures from the Rio numbers rackets remain in place and running the Rio festival. The event brings income to the city, and as they say “if a team is winning, leave it alone.” [But] how many racketeers profit from organizing the competitive parades of Rio? How much do they make? Is there laundering of dirty money using public financing of the parades? These sorts of question, when from time to time they are brought to the attention of the public, are not carried through on. The media accuses, but the media also minimizes or covers up.

In Brasília, the local government will not finance Carnaval [this year], reports G1 in another article. The federal district zeroed out its budget and does not plan to pay its workers. Heir to R$3.1 million in debt Pelo menos nos grandes centros urbanos. and projecting  a deficit of R$3.6 million this year, there will be no money to distribute to street blocs and samba societies,” G1 reports. Perhaps this is not the ideal model for financing the revels of King Momo? Will the great and sovereign market, in association with the capital of the participants and earnings from ticket sales suffice to pay for the event?

Should states and municipalities even continue to help finance the festivities nationwide? What about Rio de Janeiro, for example? Shouldn’t special attention be paid to ties linking the State [… and media oligopolies …] with the rackets and the world of organized crime in the organization of the extravagant festivities?

Should we continue to finance people guilty of proven criminal conduct during Carnaval, just because “during Carnaval, anything goes?”

See

The answers to these questions are not simple. Our country is a diverse one and Carnaval varies according to regional habits and customs. Cases should be examined in the light of their local context.

In  principle, however, if Carnaval is a popular manifestation, should it not be patronized or financed by the State? Not as  long as suspicions remain about ties to organized crime, as in the case of Rio.

Carnaval has a market all its own, and can survive on the patronage of major foreign and domestic corporations, at least in the major urban centers.

A survey by the UOL news portal this week revealed that 85.24% of respondents were against public financing of Carnaval. Only 13.04% believe the investment in Carnaval yields satisfactory returns to townships and states benefited from financial support.

We ourselves really enjoy the parade of vintage marchinhas — rib-tickling ragtime oompah sing-alongs  — sponsored by SESC and held at SESC Pompéia.

Carnaval and Government: The Samba City Initiative

If the arrangement between LIESA and state sponsorship remains uncomfortable, what are the terms of that arrangement? From the LIESA Web site:

Since 2005, the sambas societies of the Special Group are focused on their production units in Samba City, in Gamboa, in the Port Zone of the city. The project was the result of a partnership investment with the city government of Rio de Janeiro, which, thanks to the innovative and enterprising mayor Cesar Maia criou, is both a center for the Carnaval industry and another tourist attraction.

One accomplishment led to another, dreams were shared and hopes and expectations were lifted. Former LIESA president Ailton Guimarães Jorge [… note: ex-torturer …] never concealed from the mayor his concerns about growing demand for admission to the Sambadrome.

Cesar Maia had already informed Guimarães that he was negotiating with the Brahma brewery an attempted acquisition of the brewer’s lot in order to amplify the grounds of the Sambadrome. LIESA was authorized to contact the office of architect Oscar Niemeyer in order to commission a new module bleachers,friezes and sky boxes on the site, situated behind the bleachers in Sector 2.

The dream of broadening the parade route is still viable and is one of LIESA’s principal goals, along with the creation of a Carnaval Museum in Samba City. Both projects have broad support from Rio mayor Eduardo Paes, who has already announced his decision to undertake reforms of the Sambódromo with an eye to the Olympic Games of

Vintage roleta, with numbers and bichos

Vintage roleta, with numbers and bichos

Author:  Corruption Unmasked by Sergio da Motta e Albuquerque (February 10, 2015).

In 2007, the Diário de Notícias of Portugal published an article on the death threats communicated by the leading figure in the bingo rackets at the time, Anízio Abrahão David, to the parade judges, who were instructed to vote for the carnival society he patronizes, Beija-Flor (Hummingbird) of Nilópolis. The Hummingbird was victorious.

The tradition continues, according to da Motta:

Major figures from the Rio numbers rackets remain in place and running the Rio festival. The event brings income to the city, and as they say “if a team is winning, leave it alone.” [But] how many racketeers profit from organizing the competitive parades of Rio? How much do they make? Is there laundering of dirty money using public financing of the parades? These sorts of question, when from time to time they are brought to the attention of the public, are not carried through on. The media accuses, but the media also minimizes or covers up.

In Brasília, the local government will not finance Carnaval [this year], reports G1 in another article. The federal district zeroed out its budget and does not plan to pay its workers. Heir to R$3.1 million in debt Pelo menos nos grandes centros urbanos. and projecting  a deficit of R$3.6 million this year, there will be no money to distribute to street blocs and samba societies,” G1 reports. Perhaps this is not the ideal model for financing the revels of King Momo? Will the great and sovereign market, in association with the capital of the participants and earnings from ticket sales suffice to pay for the event?

Should states and municipalities even continue to help finance the festivities nationwide? What about Rio de Janeiro, for example? Shouldn’t special attention be paid to ties linking the State [… and media oligopolies …] with the rackets and the world of organized crime in the organization of the extravagant festivities?

Should we continue to finance people guilty of proven criminal conduct during Carnaval, just because “during Carnaval, anything goes?”

See

The answers to these questions are not simple. Our country is a diverse one and Carnaval varies according to regional habits and customs. Cases should be examined in the light of their local context.

In  principle, however, if Carnaval is a popular manifestation, should it not be patronized or financed by the State? Not as  long as suspicions remain about ties to organized crime, as in the case of Rio.

Carnaval has a market all its own, and can survive on the patronage of major foreign and domestic corporations, at least in the major urban centers.

A survey by the UOL news portal this week revealed that 85.24% of respondents were against public financing of Carnaval. Only 13.04% believe the investment in Carnaval yields satisfactory returns to townships and states benefited from financial support.

We ourselves really enjoy the parade of vintage marchinhas — rib-tickling ragtime oompah sing-alongs  — sponsored by SESC and held at SESC Pompéia.

Carnaval and Government: The Samba City Initiative

If the arrangement between LIESA and state sponsorship remains uncomfortable, what are the terms of that arrangement? From the LIESA Web site:

Since 2005, the sambas societies of the Special Group are focused on their production units in Samba City, in Gamboa, in the Port Zone of the city. The project was the result of a partnership investment with the city government of Rio de Janeiro, which, thanks to the innovative and enterprising mayor Cesar Maia criou, is both a center for the Carnaval industry and another tourist attraction.

One accomplishment led to another, dreams were shared and hopes and expectations were lifted. Former LIESA president Ailton Guimarães Jorge [… note: ex-torturer …] never concealed from the mayor his concerns about growing demand for admission to the Sambadrome.

Cesar Maia had already informed Guimarães that he was negotiating with the Brahma brewery an attempted acquisition of the brewer’s lot in order to amplify the grounds of the Sambadrome. LIESA was authorized to contact the office of architect Oscar Niemeyer in order to commission a new module bleachers,friezes and sky boxes on the site, situated behind the bleachers in Sector 2.

The dream of broadening the parade route is still viable and is one of LIESA’s principal goals, along with the creation of a Carnaval Museum in Samba City. Both projects have broad support from Rio mayor Eduardo Paes, who has already announced his decision to undertake reforms of the Sambódromo with an eye to the Olympic Games of 2016.

Mayor Eduardo Paes, Rio de Janeiro governor Sérgio Cabral, and the President [of the Republic, Lula] have been great friends to samba carioca, having raised substantial resources so that the parade of carnival societies might earn the reputation as the Greatest Show on Earth.

bichwin

Mayor Eduardo Paes, Rio de Janeiro governor Sérgio Cabral, and the President [of the Republic, Lula] have been great friends to samba carioca, providing substantial resources so that the parade of carnival societies might earn the reputation as the Greatest Show on Earth.