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The R$20 Billion Club |

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Source: O Cafezinho | Miguel do Rosário

The scandal at HSBC, known as Swissleaks, reveals the abysmal hypocrisy of [Brazilian] corporate media.

The case involves the names of thousands of individuals, many of them extremely wealthy, who hide their fortunes and avoid taxes in their country of origin.

In the eyes of our own native media, scandals only matter if they can be used as a political weapon against the PT and its government.

Thus, these names will not be made public unless they can be used to add fuel to the fire of some fresh scandal or fit in well with some propaganda narrative.

[But the fact is that] Brazil is one of the countries with the largest number of persons involved in  tax evasion schemes in the world.

And possibly the most bureaucratic!

The remarkably submissive Rodrigues articles involving Brazilpromises that no new names will leak, even after saying that in Brazil, “there are 6,606 bank accounts (serving 8,667 clients) and cash flow of nearly US$ 7 billion” — nearly R$ 20 billion, an amount close to what the Dilma government needs to set aside for fiscal adjustments.”

R$ 20 billion!

Rodrigues reveals only that the list comprises “business leaders, bankers, artists, athletes and intellectuals”.

Where are these names. Why not reveal them?

The Car Wash case could give rise to a debate over the crime that costs government the most: undeclared income and unpaid taxes.

But these topics are avoided like the plague in our establishment media, which attacks heterodoxy with religious fervor.

Recently, the organization Tax Justice  published two news articles involving Brazil that were completely ignored by the Brazilian press.

First, a ranking was made of countries with custody of fortunes in fiscal paradises. Brazil is in fourth place, with our native super-rich illegally maintaining more than R$ 1 trillion abroad.

Next, the same NGO released another study which positioned Brazil as second in the worldwide list of countries suffering tax evasion, second only to Russia: Brazil loses US$ 280 billion per year, compared with R$ 211 billion in Russia [sic]. (above)

In terms of [asset value under management?], Brazil loses only to the U.S.

Evasion of taxes in the U.S. was an estimated US$ 337 billion [when?], but this corresponds to a mere 2.3% of its GDP.

The same practice costs Brazilians, meanwhile, 13.4% of GDP!

What is hilarious is how easy it is for the media to use disinformation to slam the government, demanding greater control over the diversion of the taxes we pay.

Why doesn’t it do it, then?

Because it involves a criticism of the government, and a fight that the media groups don’t want to make public.

O Globo naturally prefers (as it did again today) to defend the fiscal adjustment programmed by Levy, which on one hand corrects … some distortions, and on the other takes an unnecessary bite out of labor rights.

Imagine if  O Globo were to argue that cleaning up the public treasury would take the form of a more rigorous prosecution of tax avoiders ….

This is the method used by Fernando Rodrigues (UOL), who published only the names involved in the HSBC scandal that also figure in the Car Wash money laundering case.

Rodrigues published only the names involved in the HSBC scandal that also figure in the Car Wash money laundering case and the money laundering services provided by HSBC. To date, and unlike in other countries, where the HSBC case dominates the press, our newspapers keep a lid on the story.

With remarkable submissiveness, Rodrigues promises that no new names will leak, even after reporting that in Brazil, “there are 6,606 bank accounts (serving 8,667 clients) and cash flow of near

 

BnckoxTIEAEcuyb

Source: O Cafezinho | Miguel do Rosário

The scandal at HSBC, known as Swissleaks, reveals the abysmal hypocrisy of [Brazilian] corporate media.

The case involves the names of thousands of individuals, many of them extremely wealthy, who hide their fortunes and avoid taxes in their country of origin.

In the eyes of our own native media, scandals only matter if they can be used as a political weapon against the PT and its government.

This, these names will not be made public unless they can be used to add fuel to the fire of some fresh scandal or fit in well with some propaganda narrative.

[But in fact,] Brazil is one of the countries with the largest number of persons involved in the  tax evasion schemes.

The remarkably submissive Rodrigues promises that no new names will leak, even after saying that in Brazil, “there are 6,606 bank accounts (serving 8,667 clients) and cash flow of nearly US$ 7 billion” — nearly R$ 20 billion, an amount close to what the Dilma government needs to set aside for fiscal adjustments.”

R$ 20 billion!

Rodrigues reveals only that the list comprises “business leaders, bankers, artists, athletes and intellectuals”.

Where are these names. Why not reveal theme?

The Car Wash case could give rise to a debate over the crime that costs government the most: undeclared income and unpaid taxes.

But these topics are avoided like the plague in our establishment media, which attacks heterodoxy with religious fervor.

Recently, the organization Tax Justice  published two news articles involving Brazil that were completely ignored by the Brazilian press.

First, a ranking was made of countries with custody of fortunes in fiscal paradises. Brazil is in fourth place, with our native super-rich illegally maintaining more than R$ 1 trillion abroad.

Next, the same NGO released another study which positioned Brazil as second in the worldwide list of countries suffering tax evasion, second only to Russia: Brazil loses US$ 280 billion per year, compared with R$ 211 billion in Russia [sic]. (above)

In terms of [asset value under management?], Brazil loses only to the U.S.

Evasion of taxes in the U.S. was an estimated US$ 337 billion [when?], but this corresponds to a mere 2.3% of its GDP.

The same practice costs Brazilians, meanwhile, 13.4% of GDP!

What is hilarious is how easy it is for the media to use disinformation to slam the government, demanding greater control over the diversion of the taxes we pay.

Why doesn’t it do it, then?

Because it involves a criticism of the government, and a fight that the media groups don’t want to make public.

O Globo naturally prefers (as it did again today) to defend the fiscal adjustment programmed by Levy, which on one hand corrects … some distortions, and on the other takes an unnecessary bite out of labor rights.

Imagine if  O Globo were to argue that cleaning up the public treasury would take the form of a more rigorous prosecution of tax avoiders ….

This is the method used by Fernando Rodrigues (UOL), who published only the names involved in the HSBC scandal that also figure in the Car Wash money laundering case.

With remarkable submissiveness, Rodrigues promises that no new names will leak, even after saying that in Brazil, “there are 6,606 bank accounts (serving 8,667 clients) and cash flow of nearly US$ 7 billion” — nearly R$ 20 million, an amount close to what the Dilma government needs to set aside for fiscal adjustments.”

R$ 20 billion!

Rodrigues reveals only that the list comprises “business leaders, bankers, artists, athletes and intellectuals”.

Where are these names. Why not reveal them?

The Car Wash case could give rise to a debate over the crime that costs government the most: undeclared income and unpaid taxes.

But these topics are avoided like the plague in our establishment media, which attacks economic heterodoxy with religious fervor.

Recently, the organization Tax Justice —  — published two news articles involving Brazil that were completely ignored by the Brazilian press.

First, a ranking was made of countries with custody of fortunes in fiscal paradises. Brazil is in fourth place, with our super-rich illegally maintaining more than R$ 1 trillion.

Next, the same NGO released another study which positioned Brazil as second in the worldwide list of countries suffering tax evasion, second only to Russia: Brazilians fail to pay US$ 280 billion per year, compared with R$ 211 billion in Russia [sic?].

In terms of asset value under management, Brazil loses only to the U.S.

Evasion of taxes in the U.S. was an estimated US$ 337 billion, but this corresponds to a mere 2.3% of its GDP.

The same practice costs us, meanwhile, 13.4% of GDP!

What is hilarious is how easy it is for the media to use disinformation to slam the government, demanding greater control over the diversion of the taxes we pay.

Why doesn’t it do it, then?

Because it involves a criticism of the government that the media groups don’t want to make public.

O Globo naturally prefers (as it did again today) to defend the fiscal adjustment programmed by Levy, which on one hand corrects … some distortions, and on the other takes an unnecessary bite out of labor rights.

Imagine if Globo were to argue that cleaning up the public treasury would take the form of a more rigourous prosecution of tax avoiders ….

ly US$ 7 billion” — nearly R$ 20 million, an amount close to what the Dilma government needs to set aside for fiscal adjustments.”

R$ 20 billion!

Rodrigues reveals only that the list comprises “business leaders, bankers, artists, athletes and intellectuals”.

Where are these names. Why not reveal them?

The Car Wash case could give rise to a debate over the crime that costs government the most: undeclared income and unpaid taxes.

But these topics are avoided like the plague in our establishment media, which attacks economic heterodoxy with religious fervor.

Recently, the organization Tax Justice —  — published two news articles involving Brazil that were completely ignored by the Brazilian press.

First, a ranking was made of countries with custody of fortunes in fiscal paradises. Brazil is in fourth place, with our super-rich illegally maintaining more than R$ 1 trillion.

Next, the same NGO released another study which positioned Brazil as second in the worldwide list of countries suffering tax evasion, second only to Russia: Brazilians fail to pay US$ 280 billion per year, compared with R$ 211 billion in Russia [sic?].

In terms of asset value under management, Brazil loses only to the U.S.

Evasion of taxes in the U.S. was an estimated US$ 337 billion, but this corresponds to a mere 2.3% of its GDP.

The same practice costs us, meanwhile, 13.4% of GDP!

What is hilarious is how easy it is for the media to use disinformation to slam the government, demanding greater control over the diversion of the taxes we pay.

Why doesn’t it do it, then?

Because it involves a criticism of the government that the media groups don’t want to make public.

O Globo naturally prefers (as it did again today) to defend the fiscal adjustment programmed by Levy, which on one hand corrects … some distortions, and on the other takes an unnecessary bite out of labor rights.

Imagine if Globo were to argue that cleaning up the public treasury would take the form of a more rigourous prosecution of tax avoiders ….

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