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Not | «Report of an Inquiry Into a Former President Rattles Brazil»

capa-epoca

Report of an Inquiry Into a Former President Rattles Brazil

By SIMON ROMERO

New York Times

MAY 1, 2015

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil’s political establishment was shaken on Friday by the news that federal prosecutors had opened an influence-peddling inquiry into the business activities of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the former president.who presided over Brazil’s emergence this century as a leading power in the developing world.

This is lazy and exaggerated reporting.

Rule No. 1: do not use Globo as a primary source or a casual benchmark of public opinion.

As one local blogger noted, the “Lula the Jack Abramoff of the Tropic South” meme was notably absent from the nightly Globo primetime newscast — possibly because its sister magazine was lacking solid evidence. Normally, JN will normally enunciate just about any sort of nonsense you like with a shit-eating grin on its face.

The report comes at a difficult time for the governing Workers Party, with Mr. da Silva’s protégé and successor, Dilma Rousseff, struggling with calls for her impeachment over a bribery scandal at the national oil company. Mr. da Silva, 69, was among the founders of the party in 1980.

The inquiry by a special anticorruption unit of the Public Ministry, a body of independent prosecutors, is reportedly delving into Mr. da Silva’s ties to Odebrecht, one of Brazil’s largest construction companies. That the inquiry, a preliminary step before deciding whether to open a broader investigation, had opened in recent days was first reported by the Brazilian magazine Época.

How weak is that? Where is the uproar? Hell, I was shaken by the preliminary steps taken by my wife to ascertain what I wanted for breakfast.

On citing Época on any topic more substantial than fashion and the weather, see the caveat, below.

noevidence

The Estado de São Paulo, however — the best of the conservative press — goes straight to the heart of the matter and gets a named source to call  into question the leaked imminence of a supposed probe targeting Lula (sidebars above):

The Federal District prosecutor responsible for the investigation of alleged influence-peddling by former president Lula da Silva, Mirella Aquiar says she will not apply for warrants in the case because at the moment there is “no evidence at all.”… Warrants are not commonly issued in cases based on anonymous news stories that contain no concrete evidence.

The prosecutors are examining whether Mr. da Silva improperly used his influence as a former president and one of Brazil’s most powerful political figures to obtain loans from Brazil’s national development bank, a state-controlled financial institution with a lending portfolio larger than that of the World Bank, for Odebrecht’s dealings in Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

Both Odebrecht and prosecutors received a right of reply from Época.

After eight years as president, from 2003 to 2010, when Brazil enjoyed robust economic growth and expanded its antipoverty projects, Mr. da Silva leveraged his prominence to attract lucrative speaking engagements outside Brazil. He often traveled abroad on one of Odebrecht’s private jets, Época reported, and he is also facing scrutiny over the company’s activities in Angola, Ghana and Venezuela.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for Odebrecht denied any wrongdoing in connection to the questions raised in the inquiry. Paulo Okamotto, the president of Mr. da Silva’s institute, said there was nothing improper about Mr. da Silva’s speeches.

Speaking before supporters in São Paulo on Friday during a commemoration of International Workers’ Day, Mr. da Silva did not specifically address news of the inquiry.

But in a speech, he lashed out at some in the news media, referring specifically to Época and Veja …

Report of an Inquiry Into a Former President Rattles Brazil

capa-epoca

By SIMON ROMERO

New York Times

MAY 1, 2015

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil’s political establishment was shaken on Friday by the news that federal prosecutors had opened an influence-peddling inquiry into the business activities of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the former president.who presided over Brazil’s emergence this century as a leading power in the developing world.

This is lazy and exaggerated reporting.

Rule No. 1: do not use Globo as a primary source or a casual benchmark of public opinion.

As one local blogger noted, the “Lula the Jack Abramoff of the Tropic South” meme was notably absent from the nightly Globo primetime newscast — possibly because its sister magazine was lacking solid evidence. Normally, JN will normally enunciate just about any sort of nonsense you like with a shit-eating grin on its face.

The report comes at a difficult time for the governing Workers Party, with Mr. da Silva’s protégé and successor, Dilma Rousseff, struggling with calls for her impeachment over a bribery scandal at the national oil company. Mr. da Silva, 69, was among the founders of the party in 1980.

The inquiry by a special anticorruption unit of the Public Ministry, a body of independent prosecutors, is reportedly delving into Mr. da Silva’s ties to Odebrecht, one of Brazil’s largest construction companies. That the inquiry, a preliminary step before deciding whether to open a broader investigation, had opened in recent days was first reported by the Brazilian magazine Época.

How weak is that? Where is the uproar? Hell, I was shaken by the preliminary steps taken by my wife to ascertain what I wanted for breakfast.

On citing Época on any topic more substantial than fashion and the weather, see the caveat, below.

noevidence

The Estado de São Paulo, however — the best of the conservative press — goes straight to the heart of the matter and gets a named source to call  into question the leaked imminence of a supposed probe targeting Lula (sidebars above):

The Federal District prosecutor responsible for the investigation of alleged influence-peddling by former president Lula da Silva, Mirella Aquiar says she will not apply for warrants in the case because at the moment there is “no evidence at all.”… Warrants are not commonly issued in cases based on anonymous news stories that contain no concrete evidence.

The prosecutors are examining whether Mr. da Silva improperly used his influence as a former president and one of Brazil’s most powerful political figures to obtain loans from Brazil’s national development bank, a state-controlled financial institution with a lending portfolio larger than that of the World Bank, for Odebrecht’s dealings in Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

Both Odebrecht and prosecutors received a right of reply from Época.

After eight years as president, from 2003 to 2010, when Brazil enjoyed robust economic growth and expanded its antipoverty projects, Mr. da Silva leveraged his prominence to attract lucrative speaking engagements outside Brazil. He often traveled abroad on one of Odebrecht’s private jets, Época reported, and he is also facing scrutiny over the company’s activities in Angola, Ghana and Venezuela.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for Odebrecht denied any wrongdoing in connection to the questions raised in the inquiry. Paulo Okamotto, the president of Mr. da Silva’s institute, said there was nothing improper about Mr. da Silva’s speeches.

Speaking before supporters in São Paulo on Friday during a commemoration of International Workers’ Day, Mr. da Silva did not specifically address news of the inquiry.

But in a speech, he lashed out at some in the news media, referring specifically to Época and Ve

capa-epoca

Report of an Inquiry Into a Former President Rattles Brazil

By SIMON ROMERO

New York Times

MAY 1, 2015

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil’s political establishment was shaken on Friday by the news that federal prosecutors had opened an influence-peddling inquiry into the business activities of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the former president.who presided over Brazil’s emergence this century as a leading power in the developing world.

This is lazy and exaggerated reporting.

Rule No. 1: do not use Globo as a primary source or a casual benchmark of public opinion.

As one local blogger noted, the “Lula the Jack Abramoff of the Tropic South” meme was notably absent from the nightly Globo primetime newscast — possibly because its sister magazine was lacking solid evidence. Normally, JN will normally enunciate just about any sort of nonsense you like with a shit-eating grin on its face.

The report comes at a difficult time for the governing Workers Party, with Mr. da Silva’s protégé and successor, Dilma Rousseff, struggling with calls for her impeachment over a bribery scandal at the national oil company. Mr. da Silva, 69, was among the founders of the party in 1980.

The inquiry by a special anticorruption unit of the Public Ministry, a body of independent prosecutors, is reportedly delving into Mr. da Silva’s ties to Odebrecht, one of Brazil’s largest construction companies. That the inquiry, a preliminary step before deciding whether to open a broader investigation, had opened in recent days was first reported by the Brazilian magazine Época.

How weak is that? Where is the uproar? Hell, I was shaken by the preliminary steps taken by my wife to ascertain what I wanted for breakfast.

On citing Época on any topic more substantial than fashion and the weather, see the caveat, below.

noevidence

The Estado de São Paulo, however — the best of the conservative press — goes straight to the heart of the matter and gets a named source to call  into question the leaked imminence of a supposed probe targeting Lula (sidebars above):

The Federal District prosecutor responsible for the investigation of alleged influence-peddling by former president Lula da Silva, Mirella Aquiar says she will not apply for warrants in the case because at the moment there is “no evidence at all.”… Warrants are not commonly issued in cases based on anonymous news stories that contain no concrete evidence.

The prosecutors are examining whether Mr. da Silva improperly used his influence as a former president and one of Brazil’s most powerful political figures to obtain loans from Brazil’s national development bank, a state-controlled financial institution with a lending portfolio larger than that of the World Bank, for Odebrecht’s dealings in Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

Both Odebrecht and prosecutors received a right of reply from Época.

After eight years as president, from 2003 to 2010, when Brazil enjoyed robust economic growth and expanded its antipoverty projects, Mr. da Silva leveraged his prominence to attract lucrative speaking engagements outside Brazil. He often traveled abroad on one of Odebrecht’s private jets, Época reported, and he is also facing scrutiny over the company’s activities in Angola, Ghana and Venezuela.

In a statement, a spokeswoman for Odebrecht denied any wrongdoing in connection to the questions raised in the inquiry. Paulo Okamotto, the president of Mr. da Silva’s institute, said there was nothing improper about Mr. da Silva’s speeches.

Speaking before supporters in São Paulo on Friday during a commemoration of International Workers’ Day, Mr. da Silva did not specifically address news of the inquiry.

But in a speech, he lashed out at some in the news media, referring specifically to Época and Veja …

Captura-de-Tela-2015-05-06-às-10.42.27

 Members of the federal prosecution are quoted complaining about partisan attacks on their Facebook accounts. Perhas if they used LinkIn for business and Facebook for the purely personal …