• December 2015
    M T W T F S S
    « Nov   Jun »
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  
  • Pages

  • Marginalia

  • Accumulations

Restoring the Media Latifundio: The Bitter End of Argentina’s 678

678

Sources | Carta Maior, Blue Bus (Brazil)

Restoring the media latifundio in Argentina: This is apparently one of the first priorities of the shock politics the new conservative administration intends to establish in Argentina over the next 100 days, along with other repressive measures in the areas of politics, economics and the administration of justice.

One of the first announcements of the government, even before the swearing in of Mauricio Macri … was that the television program 678, broadcast in prime time by state-owned TV Publica and competing with commercial media groups, would be discontinued.

Liked on Facebook by 850,000.

A day after winning the elections, Macri said that “the program will not continue [whether you call it] 678 or 876” … a play on words that illustrates Macri’s poor sense of humor.

With a respectable viewer base that never amounted, however, to mass appeal, 678 busied itself with unmasking false reporting in the major commercial media, in a style known for its hard-hitting, accusatory tone.

“We have our own position. We are not trying to fool the viewer with the myth of journalistic objectivity,” said one commentator known for criticizing the media and political agenda on a daily basis.

The commentators of 678 permitted themselves feats of daring never before seen — or at least not with the same level of commitment — from the private-sector media. It dared to deconstruct, piece by piece, news items planted by economic groups in the newspapers and TV news channels and to demonstrate how these media were compensated for their cooperation.

For example, 678 produced special reporting on the relationship of the Clarin group with the  military dictatorship and the background of the senior executives of the group, something no one had ever done before with this degree of clarity.

678 produced news reports on meetings held at the U.S. Embassy with opposition leaders, as well as the agreements worked out between the foreign vulture funds — which promote an economic war against Argentina — and their Argentine lobbyists, who seek to promote economic instability.

md-posicao-eua-divida-argentina

Among the most frequent topics on which the program built its reputation was a permanent X-ray of the news programming on Channel 13 (open to air) and TN-Todas Noticias (cable) — both belonging to the Clarin Group.

In terms a Brazilian might understand, it was as if a daily TV news program occupied itself with a deconstruction of the news read by Willian Bonner of Globo. The program would count on a highly organized editorial team and run in prime time.

It would also report on international stories, such as the joint effort this year between the Brazilian newsweekly Veja and El Clarin to plant and amplify phony news coverage of relations among Argentina, Venezuela and Iran,

A day after winning the elections, Macri said that “the program will not continue [whether you call it] 678 or 876” … a play on words that illustrates Macri’s poor sense of humor.

With a respectable viewer base that never amounted, however, to mass appeal, 678 busied itself with unmasking false reporting in the major commercial media, in a style known for its hard-hitting, accusatory tone.

“We have our own position. We are not trying to fool the viewer with the myth of journalistic objectivity,” said one commentator known for criticizing the media and political agenda on a daily basis.

The commentators of 678 permitted themselves feats of daring never before seen — or at least not with the same level of commitment — from the private-sector media. It dared to deconstruct, piece by piece, news items planted by economic groups in the newspapers and TV news channels and to demonstrate how these media were compensated for their cooperation.

For example, 678 produced special reporting on the relationship of the Clarin group with the  military dictatorship and the background of the senior executives of the group, something no one had ever done before with this degree of clarity.

678 produced news reports on meetings held at the U.S. Embassy with opposition leaders, as well as the agreements worked out between the foreign vulture funds — which promote an economic war against Argentina — and their Argentine lobbyists, who seek to promote economic instability.

Among the most frequent topics on which the program built its reputation was a permanent X-ray of the news programming on Channel 13 (open to air) and TN-Todas Noticias (cable) — both belonging to the Clarin Group.

In terms a Brazilian might understand, it was as if a daily TV news program occupied itself with a deconstruction of the news read by Willian Bonner of Globo. The program would count on a highly organized editorial team and run in prime time.

It would also report on international stories, such as the joint effort this year between the Brazilian newsweekly Veja and El Clarin to plant and amplify phony news coverage of relations among Argentina, Venezuela and Iran, based on anonymous sources which may well have been invented.

The supposed “three ex-diplomats” of Venezuela.

Sharp and acerbic, 678 at times committed the sin of serving as a pamphlet for kirchnernism, and at times took an excessively didactic tone, but it was never complacent.

based on anonymous sources which may well have been invented.

A day after winning the elections, Macri said that “the program will not continue [whether you call it] 678 or 876” … a play on words that illustrates Macri’s poor sense of humor.

With a respectable viewer base that never amounted, however, to mass appeal, 678 busied itself with unmasking false reporting in the major commercial media, in a style known for its hard-hitting, accusatory tone.

“We have our own position. We are not trying to fool the viewer with the myth of journalistic objectivity,” said one commentator known for criticizing the media and political agenda on a daily basis.

The commentators of 678 permitted themselves feats of daring never before seen — or at least not with the same level of commitment — from the private-sector media. It dared to deconstruct, piece by piece, news items planted by economic groups in the newspapers and TV news channels and to demonstrate how these media were compensated for their cooperation.

For example, 678 produced special reporting on the relationship of the Clarin group with the  military dictatorship and the background of the senior executives of the group, something no one had ever done before with this degree of clarity.

678 produced news reports on meetings held at the U.S. Embassy with opposition leaders, as well as the agreements worked out between the foreign vulture funds — which promote an economic war against Argentina — and their Argentine lobbyists, who seek to promote economic instability.

Among the most frequent topics on which the program built its reputation was a permanent X-ray of the news programming on Channel 13 (open to air) and TN-Todas Noticias (cable) — both belonging to the Clarin Group.

In terms a Brazilian might understand, it was as if a daily TV news program occupied itself with a deconstruction of the news read by Willian Bonner of Globo. The program would count on a highly organized editorial team and run in prime time.

It would also report on international stories, such as the joint effort this year between the Brazilian newsweekly Veja and El Clarin to plant and amplify phony news coverage of relations among Argentina, Venezuela and Iran, based on anonymous sources which may well have been invented.

The supposed “three ex-diplomats” of Venezuela.

Sharp and acerbic, 678 at times committed the sin of serving as a pamphlet for kirchnernism, and at times took an excessively didactic tone, but it was never complacent.

The supposed “three ex-diplomats” of Venezuela.

Sharp and acerbic, 678 at times committed the sin of serving as a pamphlet for kirchnernism, and at times took an excessively didactic tone, but it was never complacent.