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The (Big) State of Brazilian Journalism


Pitiful, how the Estado de S. Paulo metro daily has taken to the production of quasi-fake news of late, in the form of topical coverage of conference events produced by the newspaper itself for its various clients and then reported on as if objectively newsworthy.  Continue reading

Brazil | Clicktivism and the Impeachment Question


It is being reported widely here in  Brazil that turnout for this past weekend’s pro-impeachment demonstrations was markedly lower — by  200% or more in the most visible of urban congregations — than that of the March impeachment rallies, themselves inflated by fancy  camera angles from news photographers.

Some 500 marchers turned out to call for the downfall of the Rousas much asseff government in Salvador, Bahia, for example — an electoral redoubt of the Workers Party since the defeat of Carlismo — a sort of regional Brazilian version of Mexico’s PRI — in recent elections.

The Radar column of Veja magazine suggests that this lack of activism be weighed against what is treated as a significant volume of supporting «clicktivist» chatter on «the social networks» …

But beware the clicktivist fallacy: the notion that computer and network users represent a segment of the population proportional to support for a given proposition.

Factor in the digital divide, in other words.

For example, if 52% of the population uses the Internet, including mobile Internet — 103 million Brazilians — and 48% does not, how representative are half a million Internauts discussing impeachment for good or ill?

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Restoring the Media Latifundio: The Bitter End of Argentina’s 678


Sources | Carta Maior, Blue Bus (Brazil)

Restoring the media latifundio in Argentina: This is apparently one of the first priorities of the shock politics the new conservative administration intends to establish in Argentina over the next 100 days, along with other repressive measures in the areas of politics, economics and the administration of justice.

One of the first announcements of the government, even before the swearing in of Mauricio Macri … was that the television program 678, broadcast in prime time by state-owned TV Publica and competing with commercial media groups, would be discontinued.

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King Momo and the Car(nival) Wash


Viva o Zé Pereira,
Que a ninguém faz mal,
Viva a pagodeira,
Nos dias de Carnaval

As the annual revels get underway, the mighty Rooster of the Dawn, like most carnival societies, is not shy about lampooning its betters.

Bakhtin, after all, was right about the Carnivalesque and the four modalities of the WUD, or “world upside down.”

But not everyone is convinced. One the key figures in the Car Wash case is attempting — apparently successfully — to quash distribution of a mask depicting his face, exposing him to ridicule on national TV.

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PT | Sue You Too


Source:  PT (Brazilian political party)

The national president of the Workers’ Party,  Rui Falcão, announced today (February 11), that the party will sue former Petrobras manager Pedro Brausco, who accused the finance secretary of our party, João Vaccari Neto, of acting as a go-between in illegal fundraising for the party, without presenting any proof of this accusation.

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Mexico Stands Up to Its Globo | Conversa Afiada


I am not a big fan of the noisy Conversa Afiada –brainchild of TV Record reporter PHA — but I thank it for tipping me off to an important story from Mexico, as reported by the indomitable Carmen Aristegui, ex-CNN Español.

Regulatory agencies are attempting to rein in Televisa and its 75% lock on the Mexican broadcast media market.

Let me present an excerpt from the more technical treatment of the historic trust-busting, rule-changing decrees and resolutions, followed by an analysis by PHA, among whose virtues is an understanding of the parallels between Brazilian Globo and Mexican Televisa — both of them attempted stealers of elections — and of the activities of the Mexican magnate Carlos Slim in Brazil.

Televisa is a “dominant economic agent,” rules Ifetel

“The resolution announced yesterday by the Federal Institue of Telecommunications (IFT) imposes various and significant measures, conditions and restrictions on the broadcasting business of the Televisa Group,” the company recognizes.

IFTel declared Televisa a dominant economic agent in the broadcasting market and will subject it to a series of regulatory measures.

The empire of Emilio Azcárraga Jean will be obliged to share infrastructure, turn over to IFTel the terms and conditions of its advertising broadcasts and will not be allowed to acquire exclusive transmission rights in Mexico.

The company acknowledged that “all of these resolutions and actions of the IFT affect the Televisa Group in many areas related to its broadcasting and pay TV businesses, and we will evaluate the scope and impact in a case by case manner, in terms of its operating results, activities and businesses.

And the company warned: “As a result of the size of the declaration of dominance, with its 650 pages and of the complexity of these resolutions and proclamations, we will closely analyze any measure (of a legal, commercial or other nature) that Televisa must take in implementing them.”

Categorizing Televisa as a dominant economic actor in the telecommunications sector imposes the following conditions on its businesses:

Sharing of Infrastructure: Grupo Televisa will be required to place its broadcasting infrastructure at the disposition of third parties in a non-discriminatory, non-exclusive manner, with the exception of broadcasters broadcasters that have 12 MHz or more of broadcast spectrum in the affected region. This infrastructure includes, among other things, non-electronic components of the transmitters, right of way, towers, masts, energy sources and air conditioning systems. This measure aims to expedite the entry of new broadcasters into the market.

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Car Wash Witness | Contrary to Fact Conditional Parole?

"They knew everything"

“They knew everything”

I was leafing idly through the news coverage of Operation Car Wash — a megascandal with dozens of suspects of operating illegally inside Petrobras — thinking of doing a coverage timeline of the scandal,  when I came across a surprising statement.

TV Globo said that its sources did not confirm the version published by Veja, and described the Folha article as “distorted.”

It is very rare to see these particular establishment media outlets criticizing one another in this way.  Normally, stories like this are handled as a three-man tag-team match.

According to Valor, however, the naming of politicians involved in the case will not occur until February — Ash Wednesday, when people finally get back to work.

A tropical W$J or FT in incubation, Valor has published as a joint venture with O Globo and the Folha de S. Paulo — odd bedfellowssince May 2000. With the demise of the Gazeta Mercantil, it represents a relative concentration of the market shared with Brasil Econômico — a cousin to the Rio daily O Dia — and the business pages of the Estado de S. Paulo, along with the weekly Exame (Abril).

Bloomberg, Reuters. AFP, Yahoo News and others add a foreign flavor to the mix. The flow of information from various sources cannot but encourage the market observer.

Rumor and leakage in the Petrobras case do appear to have died down since mid-December as defendants — and officers of the court, including the federal police  — honor the gag order, in the case of defendants on pain of losing their plea deal, and leaky civil servants suffering administrative punishment.

Backgrounders [+]:

  1. Car Wash | Big Brother Is Watching
  2. Nassif on Car Wash | The Tipping Point?
  3. Watergate Braziliense: The Leaky Police on the Leaky Police

Source: CartaCapital (October 30, 2014):

Correction to Youssef deposition is a “lie,” attorney says.

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